Some vs. Any

Any and some can be synonymous; that is, they may have the same meaning. Both may be used in affirmative or negative questions:
Examples:
Will you have any?
Will you have some?
Won’t you have any?
Won’t you have some?

Generally, it is better to use some, not any, for affirmative statements and answers.
Correct: You may have some. Yes, I’d like some.
Incorrect: You may have any.

For negative statements and answers, it usually makes more sense to use any.
Examples:
I don’t want any trouble.
I can’t have any pets in my apartment.
Awkward: I can’t have some pets in my apartment.

Note that it would be fine to leave out any in the above examples entirely.
Examples:
I don’t want trouble.
I can’t have pets in my apartment.

Make sure you don’t use no when you mean any or you will have what is called a double negative.
Incorrect: I don’t want no apple pie.

 

Pop Quiz

Which of the following sentences are correct?

1. Would you like some ice cream with your chocolate cake?
2. Would you like any ice cream with your chocolate cake?
3. I would like any ice cream with my chocolate cake.
4. I don’t care for some ice cream with my chocolate cake.
5. I don’t care for ice cream with my chocolate cake.
6. I don’t care for any ice cream with my chocolate cake.
7. I don’t want no ice cream with my chocolate cake.

 

Pop Quiz Answers

1. Correct
2. Correct
3. Incorrect
4. I don’t care for any ice cream would be better.
5. Correct
6. Correct
7. Incorrect

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